The Sun News
Beloxxi Biscuit

‘IT’S NOT ABOUT SEX’, Man born without penis

Man, 44, born without penis because of ‘1-in-20 MILLION’ condition has bionic manhood fitted – but says he’s NOT excited about losing virginity to his girlfriend

A LOVED up 44-year-old who was born without a penis has had a bionic manhood fitted – but he insists the operation isn’t about sex.
Andrew Wardle was born with bladder exstrophy, a rare birth defect that means the organ, that usually sits inside the pelvis, is exposed.
Although he has testicles, the rare condition meant Andrew was born without a penis.
But after a string of operations over the last four years, the caterer has been given a bionic manhood and is one step away from finding out whether it works.
Surgeons at University College London have used muscle, nerves and skin from Andrew’s arm to build his appendage.
Now they have to complete the procedure for it to be functional.
Andrew, who has boasted in the past of bedding more than 100 women, insists the operation isn’t about sex.
He even claims he isn’t that excited about losing his virginity to long-term girlfriend Fedra Fabian.
Andrew, from Manchester, said: “My operation is one of the most expensive ever done because the surgeons had to build me a bladder and everything.
“This has taken four years. Basically my penis is there but needs to be tuned in.
“I could use it but I would rather wait because I don’t want to ruin it after all this time!
“I’ve been with my girlfriend for a few years now but it isn’t the sex I’m looking forward to.
“When you’re born without a penis and you can’t have sex, you just don’t get that excited about it.
“I’m just happy to get my life back but I could understand how if you were born with a penis but lost it, it would be hard.
“A lot of it is peer pressure – society places certain expectations on you and you feel like you have to match that.
“I’ll do it when I’m good and ready.
“A lot of people do think it’s about sex but it’s not, it’s about relationships and life.”
While bladder exstrophy typically affects one in every 40,000 births, Andrew said rare complications with his case mean his is one in around one in 20 million cases.
He had a successful op on his bladder as a child but his birth defect remained and his mum, who was just 17, made the painful decision to give Andrew up for adoption.
Growing up, he had countless kidney problems and underwent 15 operations to build a tube from his bladder so he could pass water normally.
But he managed to keep his big secret from his friends and classmates until he made the brave decision to speak to The Sun in 2015 to raise awareness of his condition.
He has turned his life around after taking an overdose when he hit rock bottom.
Andrew tries to spread a positive message to those in similar situations, such as Edinburgh man Mohammed Abad, who lost his penis in a car crash aged six.
He is now looking forward to the future and has thanked surgeon Mr David Ralph for giving him the chance to get his life back.
He said: “The NHS doesn’t always get the credit it deserves but the doctors have been amazing.
“I might even be able to have children once the final stage of the operation has been done, which is something I never thought was possible.
“I can’t thank them enough.”

►Culled from www.thesun.co uk

About author

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Archive

April 2017
M T W T F S S
« Mar    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Enquiries

Take advantage of our impressive statistics, advertise your brands and products on this site. Call Uche on +234-805-633-4351
Editor, Online: Ikenna Emewu